• What happens at the hospital when a patient has stroke symptoms?

    When a stroke occurs, every second counts. It’s essential to get to an emergency room as soon as possible so treatment can begin right away. Los Robles Hospital & Medical Center is a certified Comprehensive Stroke Center , which means our treatment program has met strict requirements set by the American Heart Association and American Stroke Association regarding the diagnosis and treatment of stroke patients. We are the first facility in Ventura County to earn this distinction and provide life-saving care for patients across the area through a multidisciplinary team of healthcare providers. Take a look behind the scenes at what happens when you go to the hospital with stroke symptoms.

    Stroke alert
    When a patient is experiencing stroke symptoms, the members of our stroke care team receive an alert. This lets them know that emergency stroke care is necessary, so that they immediately assemble in the ER to treat the patient.

    The stroke alert will reach our team if patients arrive in the emergency room with symptoms or if they call 911 and come to the hospital by ambulance. The hospital communicates continually with EMS while a patient is en route.

    Assessment
    The stroke team will determine if the patient is having a stroke, and if he or she is having an ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke. As stated in the video, this information is essential to determining a treatment plan.

    To make an accurate diagnosis, the healthcare team may use these tests:

    • Physical exam

    • CT scan or MRI

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      Cerebral angiography

    • Blood tests

    • Carotid duplex

    • Heart monitor

    Treatment
    As soon as a diagnosis is made, treatment can begin. The initial treatment depends on the type of stroke and how long the stroke has been occurring and may include medication, surgery, or a combination of the two.

    After the initial treatment, patients will be referred for rehabilitation and other aftercare services as needed to help with their recoveries.

    Los Robles Hospital & Medical Center has extensive services to provide care at every stage of a stroke, from our emergency room to our neuroendovascular program and Neuro ICU. Call 911 or come to our hospital in Thousand Oaks when stroke symptoms occur, or call (877) 888-5746 to learn more about our Comprehensive Stroke Center distinction.

  • Improving your safety when you have low vision

    Low vision can occur as the result of a number of different eye diseases, including glaucoma and diabetic retinopathy, as well as eye and brain injuries. Fortunately, there are several things you can do learn to live safely with low vision and reduce the risk of injuries or the need for emergency care . Boost your safety when you’re living with low vision with these techniques.

    Add additional lights
    The amount of lighting in your home can dramatically impact your ability to see. By installing additional lights, you can improve your vision and reduce your chances of tripping or bumping into items that could cause injury.

    Start by replacing your existing bulbs with higher wattage bulbs. In areas where overhead lighting is not sufficient, add additional lamps. Adjust your bulbs and the number of light sources in a space according to your needs.

    Create contrast
    Color contrasts are easier to see than colors in the same shade when you have low vision. Take advantage of color contrasts to increase your ability to see.

    For example, consider laying a colored blanket across the back of a white or lightly colored piece of furniture. You may also benefit from putting a black cloth or contact paper down on a surface on which you store white paper. Don’t store trip hazards, like shoes, on similarly colored carpet or flooring.

    Use talking medical devices
    If you have a chronic medical condition that requires you to use a device to manage it, then your needs don’t stop because you have low vision. Talking devices, which tell you a reading rather than requiring you to see it, will make your care easier.

    Diabetics, for instance, who need to check their blood sugar levels multiple times per day can benefit from having a talking glucose meter that reads out their test results. This allows people to make decisions about insulin dosing and meal planning without having to read the meter.

    Help is available for low vision. Make an appointment at Los Robles Hospital & Medical Center with a specialist who can help you make decisions about your care. To get a referral to a physician, call our Thousand Oaks hospital today at (877) 888-5746.

  • What are the common signs of a UTI?

    Urinary tract infections, or UTIs, are extremely common. Although women are more likely to get a UTI than men, anyone can get one at any age. Because UTIs can spread and affect other parts of the body, it’s important to know the signs so you get treatment as soon as possible and avoid the risk of complications. Here’s a look at the most common symptoms of a UTI. Consider calling your physician if you experience any of these signs.

    Pain during urination
    Pain during urination is the most frequent sign of a UTI . Most people with a UTI describe an intense burning while urinating. This symptom is usually the first sign of a UTI.

    In addition to pain during urination, you may also experience the sense that your bladder is not being emptied completely, coupled with an increase in the frequency of urination. Often, people with a UTI feel an urge to urinate but actually release very little urine.

    Fever
    As explained in the video, a UTI can cause symptoms in other part of the body. As with all many other kinds of illnesses, a UTI can cause a fever, as your body fights off infection.

    In addition to having a fever, you may feel a general sense of being unwell. Many people feel fatigue or shakiness when they have a UTI. You may also feel achy or experience pain in your back or below your ribs on your flanks.

    Changes in the smell or appearance of urine
    Often, you can see the evidence of a UTI in your urine. It may look cloudy, or it may look reddish or similar in color to soda or tea. You may also see a small amount of blood in your urine.

    With a UTI, urine may also have a foul odor or may otherwise smell stronger than normal.

    If you suspect you have a UTI or are struggling with another health issue, Los Robles Hospital & Medical Center is here to provide the care you need. Our emergency room in Thousand Oaks is open around the clock for your urgent needs, and our specialists provide a comprehensive range of healthcare services. Request a referral to a physician affiliated with our hospital by calling (877) 888-5746.

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