• Staying Healthy in Your Third Trimester

    Pregnant Woman

    For many women, the third trimester is the most enjoyable part of pregnancy, as morning sickness has generally abated and they are getting closer to meeting their baby. During the final months of gestation, the fetus is putting on weight and developing abilities that will help it survive outside the uterus. It is therefore important for you to continue practicing good health habits —especially because this will help you have more energy once the baby arrives!

    • Eating Well
      In order to minimize your risk of health complications and facilitate your baby’s growth and development, it’s important to retain sensible eating habits. While you may be experiencing cravings for sweets or salty snacks, try to consume most of your calories from produce, whole grains, and lean proteins. Remember to avoid mercury-containing fish such as shark, king mackerel, tilefish, and swordfish, and prevent listeriosis by thoroughly washing fruits and vegetables and heating deli meats before consuming them.
       
    • Staying Active
      While your body adjusts to your growing belly, you may experience back pain, swollen ankles, and constipation. The discomfort caused by these conditions can be minimized with regular exercise , so ask your physician for suggestions in formulating a workout routine. Keep in mind that your center of gravity will be different from what you are used to, so avoid activities that present a risk of falling.
       
    • Sleeping Properly
      Between excitement over having a baby, stress over preparing for the birth, and physical discomfort, sleeping during your last trimester can be difficult. Practice relaxation techniques such as meditation or ask your partner for a bedtime massage. Having a number of pillows in varying levels of firmness can help you find a comfortable position.

    Los Robles Hospital & Medical Center offers a Family Birthing Center complete with private delivery rooms, a neonatal intensive care unit, and surgical suites for cesarean births. We also provide classes for expectant parents to prepare for childbirth and breastfeeding. Call (805) 497-2727 to preregister for your delivery!

  • Staying Healthy in Your Third Trimester

    Pregnant Woman

    For many women, the third trimester is the most enjoyable part of pregnancy, as morning sickness has generally abated and they are getting closer to meeting their baby. During the final months of gestation, the fetus is putting on weight and developing abilities that will help it survive outside the uterus. It is therefore important for you to continue practicing good health habits —especially because this will help you have more energy once the baby arrives!

    • Eating Well
      In order to minimize your risk of health complications and facilitate your baby’s growth and development, it’s important to retain sensible eating habits. While you may be experiencing cravings for sweets or salty snacks, try to consume most of your calories from produce, whole grains, and lean proteins. Remember to avoid mercury-containing fish such as shark, king mackerel, tilefish, and swordfish, and prevent listeriosis by thoroughly washing fruits and vegetables and heating deli meats before consuming them.
       
    • Staying Active
      While your body adjusts to your growing belly, you may experience back pain, swollen ankles, and constipation. The discomfort caused by these conditions can be minimized with regular exercise , so ask your physician for suggestions in formulating a workout routine. Keep in mind that your center of gravity will be different from what you are used to, so avoid activities that present a risk of falling.
       
    • Sleeping Properly
      Between excitement over having a baby, stress over preparing for the birth, and physical discomfort, sleeping during your last trimester can be difficult. Practice relaxation techniques such as meditation or ask your partner for a bedtime massage. Having a number of pillows in varying levels of firmness can help you find a comfortable position.

    Los Robles Hospital & Medical Center offers a Family Birthing Center complete with private delivery rooms, a neonatal intensive care unit, and surgical suites for cesarean births. We also provide classes for expectant parents to prepare for childbirth and breastfeeding. Call (805) 497-2727 to preregister for your delivery!

  • Learn More About Cholesterol

    While cholesterol levels are typically thought of as a problem for older adults, many children have high cholesterol, which can increase their risk for heart disease later in life. If your family has a history of high cholesterol levels or your child is overweight, physically inactive, or has poor eating habits, your pediatrician may recommend that he or she be screened for high cholesterol. Watch this video to find out more about kids and cholesterol, including whether a child’s height relates to his or her cholesterol levels as an adult.

    Making health decisions for your children can be tricky, which is why Los Robles Hospital & Medical Center offers a 24-hour Consult-A-Nurse hotline. Call (805) 497-2727 for information on pediatric health or to find a doctor that fits your family’s needs.

  • Learn More About Cholesterol

    While cholesterol levels are typically thought of as a problem for older adults, many children have high cholesterol, which can increase their risk for heart disease later in life. If your family has a history of high cholesterol levels or your child is overweight, physically inactive, or has poor eating habits, your pediatrician may recommend that he or she be screened for high cholesterol. Watch this video to find out more about kids and cholesterol, including whether a child’s height relates to his or her cholesterol levels as an adult.

    Making health decisions for your children can be tricky, which is why Los Robles Hospital & Medical Center offers a 24-hour Consult-A-Nurse hotline. Call (805) 497-2727 for information on pediatric health or to find a doctor that fits your family’s needs.

  • Tips for Keeping Kids Safe Around Pools

    Girl smiles, swimming under water in the pool

    The risk of drowning is high for young children, who are naturally curious and prone to exploring. Be sure to follow these tips from one of Thousand Oaks’ heart hospitals , Los Robles Hospital and Medical Center, in order to keep your kids safe from water-related incidents.

    • Keep Toddlers Within Arm’s Length
      When you are near water or in the pool with a young child, keep him or her within immediate reach at all times. By staying within grabbing distance of children, you can quickly help them if they slip beneath the water.
       
    • Fence In Your Pool
      If a child slips into your backyard unnoticed, he or she should not be able to enter your pool area. Fence off the pool with a latching gate, and be sure that there are no unlocked windows or pet doors leading from your home into the pool area. Make sure that the fence is constructed in a way to prevent climbing and is around 60 inches high.
       
    • Enroll Kids in Swimming Lessons
      Although the shock of falling into a pool may prevent very young children from safely swimming to the edge, it is still a good idea to begin teaching kids to swim as early as possible. Such lessons impart the concept of holding one’s breath underwater and serve to educate kids on pool safety .
       
    • Never Let Anyone Swim Alone
      No matter how old or proficient at swimming your child is, he or she should never enter the pool unaccompanied. Accidents can happen in any situation, so a CPR-trained adult should always keep a close watch over kids who are swimming or playing near water.

    Teaching kids water safety and providing close supervision at all times will help your family have a fun and incident-free summer. Find out how you can protect your children from drowning and other summer dangers by calling the Los Robles Hospital & Medical Center Consult-A-Nurse healthcare referral line at (805) 497-2727.

  • Tips for Keeping Kids Safe Around Pools

    Girl smiles, swimming under water in the pool

    The risk of drowning is high for young children, who are naturally curious and prone to exploring. Be sure to follow these tips from one of Thousand Oaks’ heart hospitals , Los Robles Hospital and Medical Center, in order to keep your kids safe from water-related incidents.

    • Keep Toddlers Within Arm’s Length
      When you are near water or in the pool with a young child, keep him or her within immediate reach at all times. By staying within grabbing distance of children, you can quickly help them if they slip beneath the water.
       
    • Fence In Your Pool
      If a child slips into your backyard unnoticed, he or she should not be able to enter your pool area. Fence off the pool with a latching gate, and be sure that there are no unlocked windows or pet doors leading from your home into the pool area. Make sure that the fence is constructed in a way to prevent climbing and is around 60 inches high.
       
    • Enroll Kids in Swimming Lessons
      Although the shock of falling into a pool may prevent very young children from safely swimming to the edge, it is still a good idea to begin teaching kids to swim as early as possible. Such lessons impart the concept of holding one’s breath underwater and serve to educate kids on pool safety .
       
    • Never Let Anyone Swim Alone
      No matter how old or proficient at swimming your child is, he or she should never enter the pool unaccompanied. Accidents can happen in any situation, so a CPR-trained adult should always keep a close watch over kids who are swimming or playing near water.

    Teaching kids water safety and providing close supervision at all times will help your family have a fun and incident-free summer. Find out how you can protect your children from drowning and other summer dangers by calling the Los Robles Hospital & Medical Center Consult-A-Nurse healthcare referral line at (805) 497-2727.

  • What to Expect Before and After Surgery

    American doctor talking to businesswoman patient

    Although a surgery may last only a few hours – or even just a matter of minutes in some cases – preparing for a surgery and recuperating from it afterward usually takes more time.

    Taking these steps can help you get the best results from your surgery (though if you’re planning to have surgery, your doctor should give you specific advice to follow for your individual needs).

    Before surgery

    Tell the doctor your story. It’s important that you tell your surgeon about all the medications, supplements, and herbs you’re taking. These may affect the outcome of the surgery, such as drugs that make you bleed more. In some cases, the surgeon may recommend that you stop taking certain drugs before the surgery. Tell the doctor about your history of health problems, including allergies and any previous complications you’ve had with anesthesia. [1]

    Learn about the surgery. The surgeon should discuss the possible risks involved, which may include risks from anesthesia , infections, and excessive bleeding. Expect to sign a form that says you understand the problems that may arise related to the surgery. [1]

    The surgeon should also talk with you about how the surgery is performed, how it will affect your health, and how you’ll likely feel afterward. [2]

    Get your body ready for the surgery. If you smoke, it’s a good idea to stop smoking at least two weeks before the surgery. This can help reduce your chances of complications. You will probably need to avoid eating and drinking after midnight before the next day’s surgery. Your surgeon should tell you any other steps you need to take to prepare for the surgery. [3]

    After the surgery

    Recovering from the procedure. After the surgery, you’ll be taken to a recovery area where a nurse or other medical staff members will watch you to make sure you’re coming out of the surgery properly. You may need to stay one or more nights in the hospital, but in many cases people can go home from a surgery center the same day. [1,2]

    Follow the directions. The hospital staff will likely provide you with directions to help you recover further at home. Be sure to follow these instructions carefully. If you don’t understand any directions, ask about them before you leave the hospital. [1]

    Have help. An adult should drive you home from the hospital and stay with you for at least 24 hours afterward to help you recover. [2]

    Report your symptoms. The hospital staff should give you a phone number to call if you notice certain symptoms after the surgery. In general, these include excessive bleeding; fever; fainting; and pus, redness, or a bad smell around the surgical site. [1]

    Keep your additional appointments. Your surgeon may want to see you shortly after the procedure to make sure you’re healing properly. You may also need to keep appointments with other providers, such as physical therapists.

    To learn more about the surgeons at Los Robles and the cutting-edge treatments they deliver, contact Los Robles Hospital & Medical Center at (805) 497-2727.

  • What to Expect Before and After Surgery

    American doctor talking to businesswoman patient

    Although a surgery may last only a few hours – or even just a matter of minutes in some cases – preparing for a surgery and recuperating from it afterward usually takes more time.

    Taking these steps can help you get the best results from your surgery (though if you’re planning to have surgery, your doctor should give you specific advice to follow for your individual needs).

    Before surgery

    Tell the doctor your story. It’s important that you tell your surgeon about all the medications, supplements, and herbs you’re taking. These may affect the outcome of the surgery, such as drugs that make you bleed more. In some cases, the surgeon may recommend that you stop taking certain drugs before the surgery. Tell the doctor about your history of health problems, including allergies and any previous complications you’ve had with anesthesia. [1]

    Learn about the surgery. The surgeon should discuss the possible risks involved, which may include risks from anesthesia , infections, and excessive bleeding. Expect to sign a form that says you understand the problems that may arise related to the surgery. [1]

    The surgeon should also talk with you about how the surgery is performed, how it will affect your health, and how you’ll likely feel afterward. [2]

    Get your body ready for the surgery. If you smoke, it’s a good idea to stop smoking at least two weeks before the surgery. This can help reduce your chances of complications. You will probably need to avoid eating and drinking after midnight before the next day’s surgery. Your surgeon should tell you any other steps you need to take to prepare for the surgery. [3]

    After the surgery

    Recovering from the procedure. After the surgery, you’ll be taken to a recovery area where a nurse or other medical staff members will watch you to make sure you’re coming out of the surgery properly. You may need to stay one or more nights in the hospital, but in many cases people can go home from a surgery center the same day. [1,2]

    Follow the directions. The hospital staff will likely provide you with directions to help you recover further at home. Be sure to follow these instructions carefully. If you don’t understand any directions, ask about them before you leave the hospital. [1]

    Have help. An adult should drive you home from the hospital and stay with you for at least 24 hours afterward to help you recover. [2]

    Report your symptoms. The hospital staff should give you a phone number to call if you notice certain symptoms after the surgery. In general, these include excessive bleeding; fever; fainting; and pus, redness, or a bad smell around the surgical site. [1]

    Keep your additional appointments. Your surgeon may want to see you shortly after the procedure to make sure you’re healing properly. You may also need to keep appointments with other providers, such as physical therapists.

    To learn more about the surgeons at Los Robles and the cutting-edge treatments they deliver, contact Los Robles Hospital & Medical Center at (805) 497-2727.

  • Learn More About Your Health From These Helpful Websites

    Health Info Online

    Our recent blogs discussed cardiovascular health, stereotactic radiosurgery, and other medical and health topics. You can find out more about all of these topics by looking through the following articles or contacting Los Robles Hospital & Medical Center at (805) 497-2727.

    • Traumatic brain injuries , no matter what their perceived severity, should always be taken seriously. Visit FamilyDoctor.org to learn more about these injuries.
    • You can also find out more about concussions and mild traumatic brain injuries on the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website.
    • Trauma can also have psychological consequences. Read this article from the American Psychological Association for more information.
    • Are you prepared for a medical emergency? Read more about disaster and medical emergency preparedness on the American Red Cross website.
    • SafeKids.org provides helpful information about keeping your children safe and healthy in the home or at play.
    • Sepsis is a dangerous infection of the bloodstream. PubMed Health has more information about this condition on their website.
    • Despite its name, stereotactic radiosurgery is not actually surgery. Check out this article from MedlinePlus to learn more about this unique medical treatment.
    • Getting healthy through diet, exercise, and medical care can help to prevent the adverse effects that can come with the aging process. Visit the American Heart Association website to find ways to get healthier today.
    • Are you at risk for heart failure? Find out by visiting the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute website.
    • Read through this article to learn more about the changes that occur in the heart as the body ages.

  • Learn More About Your Health From These Helpful Websites

    Health Info Online

    Our recent blogs discussed cardiovascular health, stereotactic radiosurgery, and other medical and health topics. You can find out more about all of these topics by looking through the following articles or contacting Los Robles Hospital & Medical Center at (805) 497-2727.

    • Traumatic brain injuries , no matter what their perceived severity, should always be taken seriously. Visit FamilyDoctor.org to learn more about these injuries.
    • You can also find out more about concussions and mild traumatic brain injuries on the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website.
    • Trauma can also have psychological consequences. Read this article from the American Psychological Association for more information.
    • Are you prepared for a medical emergency? Read more about disaster and medical emergency preparedness on the American Red Cross website.
    • SafeKids.org provides helpful information about keeping your children safe and healthy in the home or at play.
    • Sepsis is a dangerous infection of the bloodstream. PubMed Health has more information about this condition on their website.
    • Despite its name, stereotactic radiosurgery is not actually surgery. Check out this article from MedlinePlus to learn more about this unique medical treatment.
    • Getting healthy through diet, exercise, and medical care can help to prevent the adverse effects that can come with the aging process. Visit the American Heart Association website to find ways to get healthier today.
    • Are you at risk for heart failure? Find out by visiting the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute website.
    • Read through this article to learn more about the changes that occur in the heart as the body ages.